Adhesives

Case study

Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) Calibration
Cohesive zone modeling is a powerful tool for predicting delamination in adhesively bonded structures. Veryst engineers use their expertise in experimental and computational fracture mechanics to calibrate cohesive zone models for accurate prediction of adhesive failure.
Delamination in Microfluidic Valves
A commonly encountered failure mode in microfluidic devices is delamination between adjacent device layers. Veryst examined the influence of control channel geometry on the delamination pressure of a pneumatic microfluidic valve using finite element analysis.
FTIR microscopy analysis of thermoplastic solvent bonding
Solvent bonding, although an effective way to join thermoplastics, can pose process challenges that reduce bond strength. Veryst uses FTIR microscopy to characterize the interface structure of solvent bonds, obtaining a “chemical image” of the solvent-bonded interface. The result is a full understanding of the bond and ways to improve its strength and reliability.
Impact Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints
Veryst developed a new test method for measuring fracture toughness under impact loading that does not require measurement of load or crack length. We have used this method to help clients in the automotive and electronics industry understand how adhesives fail under impact conditions.
Optimizing Additively Manufactured Parts for Adhesive Assembly
Veryst used topology optimization to design an additively manufactured bracket for adhesive assembly and then used cohesive zone modeling to predict the strength of the bonded joint.
Peeling of a Soft Polymer Film
The peel test is widely used to measure the adhesion of thin, compliant films to rigid substrates. An accurate model of the peeling mechanics is required to extract the interface adhesion energy. Veryst used the PolyUMod® material model library along with a cohesive zone model of interface adhesion to simulate the peeling of a soft viscoplastic film from a rigid substrate.
Real-Time Monitoring of Adhesive Curing and Kinetic Model Calibration
Designing an assembly process using a thermoset adhesive can be challenging without an understanding of the adhesive curing kinetics. Veryst engineers use FTIR spectroscopy to analyze curing and optimize processing steps.
Underfill Adhesive Flow and Cure
The microelectronics packaging industry relies heavily on adhesive bonding to assemble electronic components. Veryst built a COMSOL Multiphysics model of a thermocompression bonding process to help reduce bonding cycle time by simultaneously optimizing material and process variables.

Service

Adhesive Joints & Interfaces
Veryst assists clients with the selection of adhesive materials, development of bonding processes, and mechanical analysis of interfaces. We employ chemical characterization, mechanical testing, and advanced computational methods to design robust adhesively bonded structures and to understand delamination failures.
Medical Devices
Veryst works with clients to develop high-performance, reliable, and manufacturable medical devices. We apply advanced characterization technologies, engineering analysis, and sophisticated simulation software to provide cost-effective solutions to time-critical engineering problems.
Specialized Expertise

Veryst engineers and scientists offer additional specialized expertise in a wide range of important areas, including the following fields.  In each case, we concentrate on meeting client need through the application of fundamental engineering science.

Testing

Veryst’s mechanical testing capabilities have been developed over the past decade and are motivated by the need for high quality data to characterize complex polymer behavior.  We tailor our test programs based on our deep understanding of polymer and material mechanics and the challenges complex

News item

COMSOL blog features Veryst's work simulating bonding of underfill adhesives
Veryst’s simulation expertise was highlighted in a COMSOL blog that describes how Veryst simulated the flow and cure of a non-conductive film during the thermocompression bonding process.
Veryst adds FTIR microscope to materials analysis lab

Veryst is excited to announce that we have expanded our materials analysis capabilities by adding a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscope to our materials analysis lab.

Veryst continues to grow!
Veryst is happy to announce that Dr. Mark Oliver has joined our engineering team. Dr. Oliver has broad expertise in the structure and mechanical behavior of engineering materials. He has worked extensively on adhesive joints, materials interfaces, and thin films, with particular focus on the topics of fracture, fatigue, and delamination.

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